Nombre
Lepidópteros de Costa Rica
Propietario
info@ala.org.au
Tipo
Local checklist
Descripción
This ongoing inventory of the caterpillars, their parasitoids, and their food plants of Area de Conservacion Guanacaste (ACG), northwestern Costa Rica, began tentatively in 1977 and seriously in 1978. It began within walking distance of the Area Administrativa (Administration Area), the central housing and office area, of the then newly declared (1971) Parque Nacional Santa Rosa (PNSR; SRNP; Santa Rosa National Park, 10,000 ha). This original national park was then a region covered with large expanses of pasture and dry forest remnants between the Interamerican Highway (PanAmerican Highway, Ruta 1) and Playa Naranjo on the Pacific Ocean (map). It had been a variously active cattle ranch, rice farms, and small holdings since at least 1588 (the second ranch to be established in Costa Rica), and subject to severe anthropogenic fires, logging, hunting, watercourse diversion as well as standard agriculture and ranching. In 1976 there were still 2,000+ cattle in PNSR, but these were removed by the Costa Rican government in 1976-1977, and the resulting enormous amount of grass fuel for the annual dry season anthropogenic fires destroyed yet more trees and forest. Since about 1985, the dry forest of PNSR, today Sector Santa Rosa of ACG, has been in a steady and irregular state of restoration/regeneration, encouraged by the near elimination of fires but unpredictably and variously influenced by the oncoming warming and drying that began to be apparent by the early 1980's. While the inventory began in the dry forest of the small Parque Nacional Santa Rosa (PNSR), it has since expanded with the growth and expansion of PNSR to occupy at least 120,000 terrestrial ha (and another 43,000 marine ha), covering not only a very large area of dry forest but also the adjacent cloud forest and rain forest and innumerable interdigitations and intergrades, extending up to 2,000 m elevation and down to 90 m elevation rain forest in the Caribbean coastal plain far to the east (map). Throughout this mosaic of the three major terrestrial tropical ecosystems (aside from desert), there are also all ages of succession ranging from recent logging operations and recently cultivated fields to 400-year-old pasture being allowed to regenerate to forest. Goal/Mission. The goal of the inventory is to find "all" of the 12,500+ species of caterpillars in ACG on at least one native food plant species, rear them so as to associate caterpillars with adults and to inventory their parasitoids; photograph and otherwise database the caterpillar so that it is identifiable; and get all of this information into a public web site. As of the end of 2009 the project has "done" about 4,500 species of ACG caterpillars. The inventory is designed to continue until "done", while recognizing that owing to oncoming changes from insularity and climate change, as well as succession (restoration/regeneration) it will never be absolutely total. Equally, it is in the nature of inventory sampling that the truly last new species will never actually be found, though for a specific higher taxon (such as the moth family Saturniidae or the plant family Fabaceae) all ACG species may be located (though some will disappear in time, and new ones may arrive). This database reports the cumulative results of this ongoing caterpillar, parasitoid and food plant inventory, with each year's new records added in February of the following year. Records of the current year are variously available from the authors through targeted request to djanzen@sas.upenn.edu and whallwac@sas.upenn.edu. Currently, 30,000 to 40,000 new records are being added annually. While the scope of the inventory was initially just the dry forest of Sector Santa Rosa, by the end of the 1980's it began to expand eastward and upward into the wetter and colder parts of ACG. It was quickly discovered that caterpillars brought from these other ecosystems, habitats and microclimates for rearing in the temperature (and humidity) regime of Santa Rosa had a low survival rate, even if their food plants could be located. This in turn led to the gradual establishment of rearing barns in other parts of ACG, today forming a network of 13 stations and rearing barns as follows: Santa Rosa, dry forest, 295 m (0-600 m) Los Almendros, intergrade dry forest and rain forest, 290 m (250-900 m) Pitilla, rain forest, 675 m (300-900 m) Quica, rain forest, 470 m (400-500 m) Brasilia, rain forest, 320 m (300-500 m), Leiva, rain forest, 450 m (90-450 m) Botarrama, rain forest, 147 m (100-600 m), Llanura, rain forest, 90 m (90-600 m), Caribe, rain forest, 400 m (90-900 m) San Gerardo, rain forest, 575 m (400-900 m) Cacao, cloud forest, 1150 (800-1400 m) Gongora (currently inactive), intergrade dry forest and rain forest, 570 m (500-800 m) La Perla, intergrade dry forest and rain forest. 375 m (300-900 m) The collecting areas for all stations include forest of varied stages of regeneration and small to large amounts of primary forest.
URL
http://janzen.sas.upenn.edu/caterpillars/introductory/preface.htm
Fecha de creación
2018-11-10
Date updated
2018-11-10
Privada
No
Con páginas de especies
No
Verificada
No
Especies invasivas
No
Especies amenazadas
No
Con datos sensitivos
No
Región
Not provided
Metadata link
http://datos.conagebio.go.cr/public/show/drt1541900017762

2634 taxones

1934 especies distintas

681 taxones desconocidos

Refine results

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Abablemma grandimacula
Abablemma grandimacula
 
thumbnail species image
Abablemma ulopus Dyar, 1914
Abablemma ulopus Dyar, 1914 Dyar, 1914
 
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Abacena accincta Felder, 1874
Abacena accincta Felder, 1874 Felder, 1874
 
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Abrochocis esperanza Schaus, 1911
Abrochocis esperanza Schaus, 1911 Schaus, 1911
 
thumbnail species image
Acanthodica albiplena
Acanthodica albiplena
 
thumbnail species image
Acanthodica grandis
Acanthodica grandis
 
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Acanthodica pamela Schaus
Acanthodica pamela Schaus Schaus
 
thumbnail species image
Acanthodica penicillium
Acanthodica penicillium
 
thumbnail species image
Acanthodica splendens
Acanthodica splendens
 
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Accinctapubes albifasciata Druce, 1902
Accinctapubes albifasciata Druce, 1902 Druce, 1902
 
Acción Nombre provisto Nombre científico (encontrado) Imagen Autor (encontrado) Nombre común (encontrado)
Abablemma grandimacula
(unmatched - try Google, Occurrences)
Abablemma ulopus Abablemma ulopus Dyar, 1914 Dyar, 1914
Abacena accincta Abacena accincta Felder, 1874 Felder, 1874
Abrochocis esperanza Abrochocis esperanza Schaus, 1911 Schaus, 1911
Acanthodica albiplena
(unmatched - try Google, Occurrences)
Acanthodica grandis
(unmatched - try Google, Occurrences)
Acanthodica pamelia Acanthodica pamela Schaus Schaus
Acanthodica penicillium
(unmatched - try Google, Occurrences)
Acanthodica splendens
(unmatched - try Google, Occurrences)
Accinctapubes albifasciata Accinctapubes albifasciata Druce, 1902 Druce, 1902
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